I am not here
brucesterling:

The New York Times, 1858

*The guy who wrote this may have been right 

brucesterling:

The New York Times, 1858

*The guy who wrote this may have been right 

ancientpeoples:

Black-figured plate, attributed to the painter Psiax
Greek
c.520-500 BCMade in Athens, Greece; from Vulci in Etruria (now in Lazio, Italy)
An archer blowing a trumpet
The archer on this plate wears a flapped and pointed cap, patterned trousers and a long-sleeved top. His costume is unusual, and is mostly Scythian in origin, as is the combined bow-case and quiver hanging from his waist. Scythian archers were employed as mercenaries in Athens from the mid-sixth century until 514 BC, when the Persian conquest of Thrace cut lines of communication and recruitment with Scythia. After this, Greek archers start to appear on vase paintings: they retain many elements of Scythian dress, but unlike the generally bearded Scythians, they are shown clean-shaven, as here. The trumpet this figure blows is thesalpinx, blown in battle.
This plate was painted by Psiax, who worked in both the conventional black-figure and the new red-figure techniques. The design, with the single black figure set on a plain clay background, looks like a translation into black-figure of a contemporary red-figure decorative scheme. Comparing it with a red-figure plate by the painter Epiktetos, which also shows a single archer, the opportunities offered by the newer technique are clear. The red-figure archer stands out more boldly against his black background; more varied and intricate patterns can be achieved because the details of his costume are painted rather than incised.
Source: British Museum

ancientpeoples:

Black-figured plate, attributed to the painter Psiax

Greek

c.520-500 BC
Made in Athens, Greece; from Vulci in Etruria (now in Lazio, Italy)

An archer blowing a trumpet

The archer on this plate wears a flapped and pointed cap, patterned trousers and a long-sleeved top. His costume is unusual, and is mostly Scythian in origin, as is the combined bow-case and quiver hanging from his waist. Scythian archers were employed as mercenaries in Athens from the mid-sixth century until 514 BC, when the Persian conquest of Thrace cut lines of communication and recruitment with Scythia. After this, Greek archers start to appear on vase paintings: they retain many elements of Scythian dress, but unlike the generally bearded Scythians, they are shown clean-shaven, as here. The trumpet this figure blows is thesalpinx, blown in battle.

This plate was painted by Psiax, who worked in both the conventional black-figure and the new red-figure techniques. The design, with the single black figure set on a plain clay background, looks like a translation into black-figure of a contemporary red-figure decorative scheme. Comparing it with a red-figure plate by the painter Epiktetos, which also shows a single archer, the opportunities offered by the newer technique are clear. The red-figure archer stands out more boldly against his black background; more varied and intricate patterns can be achieved because the details of his costume are painted rather than incised.

Source: British Museum

You've pondered what HBO is going to do when the TV series catch with the books. Here's a crazy idea. What about a prequel to Game of thrones. Could be: 1. Robert's rebellion 2. Aegon and his sister's rise to power
Anonymous

parislemon:

I really like that idea. Let’s hope they do that.

There are several “prequels” already published. The stories of Dunk and Egg - http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tales_of_Dunk_and_Egg - and a civil war between Targaryens

wearethetay:

jedavu:

Charming Illustrated Cinemagraphs Reflect The Idyllic Mood Of Lazy Summer Days

by Rebecca Mock 

You can feel each one…

California is parched, with 100 percent of the Golden State entrenched in drought conditions for the first time in 15 years, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor (USDM). “With the expansion of D1 [moderate drought] across southeast California and southwest Arizona, this week marks the first time in the 15-year history of the USDM that 100 percent of California was in moderate to exceptional drought,” according to a statement by the Monitor, which is a joint effort by the National Drought Mitigation Center, NOAA, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. drought observers. Since March 25, the state has been under “abnormally dry” conditions, and just this week the Drought Monitor listed the entire state as experiencing a moderate drought.